Genoni

Genoni

Visit inland Sardinia

Territory of Genoni

ORIGINS
The very ancient origin of the town is attested by the numerous constructions in the area; in the map of nuraghi density, made by Prof. Giovanni Lilliu, Genoni is among the areas with a density greater than 0.60 nuraghi per km², many of which can still be visited. The elevated position of the hill of Santu Antine, on which Genoni lies, certainly invited people from the earliest times to settle in this area. Punics, Romans and most likely even Vandals reached and then chose to inhabit both the Giara and the hill of Santu Antine; as the identified ruins from the different eras suggest. The walls of a Punic fortress on the hill, and, also on the hilltop, the ruins of a Roman church dedicated to St. Helen and St. Constantine. The villages of Santu Pedru, Mammuzzola, the spectacular Bruncu Suergiu and the sacred well of Sa corona arrubia. The village has never reached a large size, probably because of its location set back from the main roads.

LANDSCAPE

The municipal territory of Genoni, part of the historical region of Sarcidano (central Sardinia), covers an area of about 44 km2, at altitudes ranging from about 300 to 600 m above sea level(Genoni, 447 m above sea level). This territory, although not very extensive, shows a singular variety of geomorphological landscapes; due to a prolonged geological and paleogeographical evolution that has seen a succession of major tectonic, volcanic, sedimentary, and morphogenetic events that can be traced back to about 300 million years ago, i.e., to the end of the Paleozoic Era, but with a greater incidence in the last 25 million years or so. Dominating this soft landscape is the distinctive isolated truncated-conical relief of the mountain of Santu Antine (591 m a.s.l.), also, like Giara Park, carved in Miocene marls and bearing at its summit a remnant patch of Pliocene basalt. On the southeastern slope of this hill lies, in a beautiful, moderately elevated position, the town of Genoni, the one and the other forming together a striking landscape combination now classic in the Island and strongly characterizing this territory. The area boasts a thousand-year human presence attested by a considerable number of nuraghi, artifacts and a sacred well.

THE GIARA PARK

The name Giara, Sa Jara, probably comes from the Latin glarea (gravel), referring to the widespread stoniness that characterizes the surface of the plateau. The Pliocene basalt Giara plateau (500-600 m a.s.l.) surrounded by 11 municipalities, covers about 45 km² of territory. Steep crags of dark lava rock, from which roaring waterfalls sometimes cascade, surround this vast plateau, whose surprisingly flat top is embellished by the striking water features of the paulis (Pauli Tramatzu, Pauli Maiori, etc.) with their splendid, whitish spring blooms of water buttercups. The steep slopes of the Giara, lush with verdant forests and Mediterranean scrub, are molded in the soft marly marine sediments of the Miocene, in places incised by steep seasonal water channels. On these slopes, frequent springs (funtanas or mitzas) often originate from the infiltration of rainwater along the latticework of diaclasis across the summit basaltic rock. Due to its remarkable landscape-naturalistic values, the Giara Plateau has been included among the nine natural parks provided for by Regional Law No. 31 of 1989

WHAT TO SEE IN GENONI

The Giara Horse Museum was created with the intention of enhancing and preserving two characteristic aspects of our territory:

The Giara horse raise awareness of this unique horse breed that still lives on the basaltic Giara plateau
unveil the customs and traditions of an area rich in traditions related, in part, to this important animal.
The museum, set up inside a faithfully restored old and typical Genoese house, is divided into two sections, one relating to the Giara horse and horses in general and another purely ethnographic, dedicated to the peasant culture of the area.

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The creation of the Genoni Convent Archdiocese of Arborea-Oristano, which, as in the cases of Gadoni and Fonni, pushed the Friars Minor to open new foundations in their jurisdiction.

The decision to found the Convent dates back to December 12, 1609, although Laconi was listed as the host country. It was the figure of Fr. Pietro Locci that was important in making Genoni preferred over Laconi: he also convinced the Marquis of Laconi in that decision, while the assent from the competent Ecclesiastical Authority was given on July 20, 1638.The official mandate to Fr. Pietro Locci to found the new Convent of St. Sebastian in Genoni dates back to October 28, 1638. The deed of incorporation is dated October 14, 1638.

The two ancient churches of St. Sebastian the Martyr and the Holy Sepulcher ( so called because it adjoins the cemetery) were the site chosen where the Convent was to be built; the aforementioned churches were united. A third church was built, in honor of St. Sebastian the Martyr, which gave the Convent its name and title. The people of Genoni participated in its construction free of charge, with one working day each, as established by the chapters of agreement between the Friars Minor of Sardinia and the People and Community of Genoni. The conditions of the Friars toward the Community were:
a stable and permanent presence of a Franciscan Community, composed of no less than 12 Friars, whose main task is of a pastoral nature
A stable Preacher throughout the year for preaching on Lent, Advent and any other Christian holidays in the Parish
a Grammar teacher for Genoni’s student boys and in the future open a study of Rhetoric and Philosophy
Collaboration and participation with the community in every pastoral and spiritual endeavor in the country
In the beginning, the relationship between the religious and the village was fruitful; the Convent also owned land for the Friars to apply the fruits derived from the Masses. Its cultural role within the Community was also important; in fact, in 1778 a list of the volumes in the Convent Library was compiled, giving a total of 413 volumes divided into the sections: Sacred Scripture, Moral Theology, Mystical Theology, Philosophy, History, Hagiography, Preaching, Liturgy, Franciscanism, Mariology, Sacramental Theology, Classical Literature, Grammar and Rhetoric.

From the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 19th century, however, the Convent of St. Sebastian went into decline. Around 1840 Casalis notes that “the friars are now reduced to three or four from many who were at other times.” This was due to misunderstandings that arose between the Religious and the Genoni Municipal Administration, based on mutual accusations of carelessness and non-compliance with initial covenants and conditions. The Friars were accused of no longer fulfilling the ‘education of young people as in the past, while the administration was blamed for not remunerating the Convent’s teachers.

P. Benedetto Pillitu, after visiting the Genoni Convent, wrote to Fr. Bernardino Trionfetti from Montefranco on January 30, 1861 that he had decided to withdraw the Friars from Genoni. The decision stemmed from the realization of the now strained relations between the Religious and the Community, referred to by Father as “not a grateful population.” The problems indicated were both economic-the unpaid teachers-and safety-the building where the friars were housed was unsafe- .
In 1862 the Convents of the Province of St. Saturnino ( of which Genoni was also a part) were suppressed by the Italian government.

The parish church named after St. Barbara was originally a secondary church dedicated to Our Lady of Grace. Its earliest structures are from the 12th century, and the oldest part is the stone cross vault unearthed during restoration work in 1986. From its origins, the shape of the church was enlarged with a large nave that made it a Latin cross with a wooden truss vault.

Over the years, several restoration works were necessary: in particular, the 1808 intervention with which the present marble high altar was placed, replacing the wooden one from 1654. In 1923, a new chapel dedicated to St. Savior of Horta was built. In 1986, during major restoration work, the polished marble floor was restored, and in 2008 work was done on the interior in order to eliminate conspicuous moisture from the walls.

Festivities in honor of St. Barbara patron saint of Genoni are celebrated on Dec. 4.

Sardinia presents, in different areas of its territory, valuable fragments of its geological history.

In the territory of Genoni, a site of very important geological and paleontological significance was discovered in the 1980s.

A present-day tropical setting can help us imagine what Duidduru might have looked like in the Miocene; the stratigraphy of the site and the wealth of fossils present are some of the elements that make the site scientifically interesting.

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The Giara Park, Giara di Gesturi or Sa Jara Manna, (500-600 m a.s.l.), falls on 4 municipalities: Genoni, Gesturi, Setzu and Tuili. It is spread over 44 square kilometers, about 15 of which belong to the municipality of Genoni. The name Giara (Sa Jara, Pranu ‘e Jara) appears to derive from the Latin glarea (gravel), referring to the widespread stoniness that characterizes its surface.

The Giara is a basaltic plateau with distinctive features, a huge natural fortress in the center of Sardinia that holds a wealth of endemic flora and a fairy-tale environment. It is best known for the Giara horses, spring blooms, and the small lakes known as Paulis.

Steep crags of dark lava rock, from which roaring waterfalls sometimes cascade, surround this vast plateau, whose surprisingly flat top is embellished by the striking water features of the paulis (Pauli Tramatzu, Pauli Maiori, etc.), with their splendid, whitish spring blooms of water buttercups. The Giara’s steep slopes, lush with verdant forests and Mediterranean scrub, are shaped in the soft Miocene marine marly sediments, in places incised by steep seasonal water channels. On these slopes, frequent springs (funtanas or mitzas) often originate from the infiltration of rainwater along the latticework of diaclasis across the summit basaltic rock.

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The archaeological site of Bruncu Suergiu is located in the Giara Park, within the Agris area in the municipality of Genoni.
The archaeological site is hidden by vegetation and difficult to reach. Traces of ancient roads, a large settlement with production facilities, and fortification structures characterize the site. In addition to the huge amount of material, a large terrace, partly natural and partly man-made in ancient times, overlooks the Campidano offering breathtaking views. The view alone repays the long and arduous walk. The archaeological area, placed under protection by the Ministry of Culture, is about 11 hectares.

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